Librarians: Plan Ahead for April – National Alcohol Awareness Month


from The Pulse by hwatkins

To support your library’s health programming strategy, here are April 2013 health programming ideas – brought to you by The Pulse, part of the Gale Health and Wellness Resource Center. Keep looking for us around the first of each month to find resources for two months out. 

Drinking too much is anywhere from unhealthy to deadly, and while for some drinking is reserved for occasional celebrations, for others it is a daily, devastating addiction. Bringing National Alcohol Awareness Month to your library has value and will be easy with these free resources and with information from Gale Health and Wellness Resource Center:

Quick and Easy

Printables for Children

Coloring pages:

Activity Pages and Booklets:

Printables for Adults:

Books

Trustworthy Online Resources

Book Club

For Adults: Fiction

Maine by J. Courtney Sullivan
Vintage, 2012

From the author’s website:

“The Kelleher family has been coming to Maine for sixty years. Their beachfront cottage, won on a barroom bet after the war, is a place where children run in packs, showers are taken outdoors, and threadbare sweaters are shared on chilly nights. It is also a place where cocktail hour follows morning mass, nosy grandchildren snoop in drawers, and ancient grudges simmer below the surface. As Maggie, Kathleen, and Anne Marie descend on Alice and the cottage, each woman brings her own baggage—a secret pregnancy, a terrible crush, and a deeply held resentment for misdeeds of the past.

By turns uproarious and achingly sad, Maine unveils the sibling rivalry, alcoholism, social climbing, and Catholic guilt at the center of one family, along with the abiding, often irrational love that keeps them coming back every summer to the family house, and to one another.”

For Adults: Non-Fiction

Dry: A Memoir by Augusten Burroughs
Picador, 2004

From the publisher:

“From the bestselling author of Running with Scissors comes Dry—the hilarious, moving, and no less bizarre account of what happened next.

You may not know it, but you’ve met Augusten Burroughs. You’ve seen him on the street, in bars, on the subway, at restaurants: a twenty-something guy, nice suit, works in advertising. Regular. Ordinary. But when the ordinary person had to drinks, Augusten was circling the drain by having twelve; when the ordinary person went home at midnight, Augusten never went home at all. Loud, distracting ties, automated wake-up calls, and cologne on the tongue could only hide so much for so long. At the request (well, it wasn’t really a request) of his employers, Augusten landed in rehab, where his dreams of group therapy with Robert Downey, Jr., are immediately dashed by the grim reality of fluorescent lighting and paper hospital slippers. But when Augusten is forced to examine himself, something actually starts to click, and that’s when he finds himself in the worst trouble of all. Because when his thirty days are up, he has to return to his same drunken Manhattan life—and live it sober. What follows is a memoir that’s as moving as it is funny, as heartbreaking as it is real. Dry is the story of love, loss, and Starbucks as a higher power.”

Community Resources

Team up with national and local organizations to bring Alcohol Awareness Month to your community.

Publicity Resources

Use this free material alongside your library’s May programming information – newsletter, blog, posters, or flyers – to promote both your library’s programs and healthy vision month.

Fun Stuff

Goof off at the reference desk and amaze your friends on Twitter . . . OR add a fun interactive experience to a library program and enhance your library website with these fun and interesting links:

For Children

 

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