OverDrive Summer Reading Program

keepreading-600x300OverDrive is excited to introduce an inaugural OverDrive Summer Read program, designed to encourage students to keep reading all year long. This program aims to help prevent the Summer Slide by providing exciting titles young readers that are simultaneously available during the summer weeks. The below titles will be automatically added  with unlimited access from June 9-July 9 to our eReading Room For Kids Similar to the Big Library Read this program will enable young readers to enjoy these titles without any wait lists or holds during the summer.

The Fat Boy Chronicles by Diane Lang & Michael Buchanan. It’s bad enough being the new kid, but as a freshman, Jimmy finds school less enjoyable than many of his classmates. Standing 5’5″ and weighing 187 pounds, he’s subjected to a daily barrage of taunts and torments. His only sources of comfort are his family, his youth group, and his favorite foods. When his English teacher assigns a journal as a writing project, Jimmy chronicles not only his struggles but also his aspirations – to lose weight and win the girl of his dreams. Inspired by a true story and told in first-person journal entries, The Fat Boy Chronicles brings to life the pain and isolation felt by many overweight teenagers as they try to find their way in a world obsessed with outward beauty.

Red Berries, White Clouds, Blue Sky by Sandra Dallas. It’s 1942: Tomi Itano, 12, is a second-generation Japanese American who lives in California with her family on their strawberry farm. Although her parents came from Japan and her grandparents still live there, Tomi considers herself an American. She doesn’t speak Japanese and has never been to Japan. But after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, things change. No Japs Allowed signs hang in store windows and Tomi’s family is ostracized.

Things get much worse. Suspected as a spy, Tomi’s father is taken away. The rest of the Itano family is sent to an internment camp in Colorado. Many other Japanese American families face a similar fate. Tomi becomes bitter, wondering how her country could treat her and her family like the enemy. What does she need to do to prove she is an honorable American? Sandra Dallas shines a light on a dark period of American history in this story of a young Japanese American girl caught up in the prejudices and World War II.

Look for them June 9th!

Science, Social Studies and National Geographic

cool inventions may 2013We just added Science Power and Social Studies Power from World Book and National Geographic Kids to our list of databases. Search widgets can also be found on Databases A-Z as well as select Hot Topic pages.

The World Book additions are great for teachers as well students. Be sure to point them out to your Home Schooling groups and private schools.

National Geographic Kids, contains magazines and ebooks. This resource will be a great to get kids reading during Club Read this summer.

More Kids Reading Using eReaders

kids favorites2From a blog post on No Shelf Required

Scholastic recently released a new study on kid’s reading in the digital age.  The study found that kids reading of ebooks has nearly doubled since 2010. Full details are on the Scholastic site or you can download the full report with appendices here.

Below are some highlights of the study from the Scholastic site:

Kids, Families, and eBooks

  • The percent of children who have read an ebook has almost doubled since 2010 (25% vs. 46%).
  • Among children who have read an ebook, one in five says he/she is reading more books for fun; boys are more likely to agree than girls (26% vs. 16%).
  • Half of children age 9–17 say they would read more books for fun if they had greater access to ebooks – a 50% increase since 2010.
  • Seventy-five percent of kids who have read an ebook are reading ebooks at home, with about one in four reading them at school.
  • Seventy-two percent of parents are interested in having their child read ebooks.
  • Eighty percent of kids who read ebooks still read books for fun primarily in print.
  • Kids say that ebooks are better than print books when they do not want their friends to know what they are reading, and when they are out and about/traveling; print is better for sharing with friends and reading at bedtime.
  • Fifty-eight percent of kids age 9–17 say they will always want to read books printed on paper even though there are ebooks available – a slight decrease from 2010 (66%).

Kids’ Reading Frequency and Attitudes toward Reading

  • Among girls, there has been a decline since 2010 in frequent readers (42% vs. 36%), reading enjoyment (71% vs. 66%), and the importance of reading books for fun (62% vs. 56%).
  • Compared to 2010, boys are more likely to think reading books for fun is important (39% in 2010 vs. 47% in 2012), but they still lag girls on this measure (47% for boys in 2012 vs. 56% for girls in 2012).
  • Frequency of reading books for fun is significantly lower for kids age 12–17 than for children age 6–11; frequency of reading books for school is also lower for kids age 12–17 than for kids age 6–11.

Parents’ Role in Kids’ Reading Practice

  • About half of parents (49%) feel their children do not spend enough time reading books for fun, while the vast majority of parents think their children spend too much time playing video games or visiting social networking sites.
  • The percentage of parents who say their child does not spend enough time reading for fun has increased since 2010 across all age groups of children (36% in 2010 to 49% in 2012).
  • Having reading role-model parents or a large book collection at home has more of an impact on kids’ reading frequency than does household income.
  • Building reading into kids’ schedules and regularly bringing additional books into the home for children positively impact kids’ reading frequency.

Summer Reading

  • Ninety-nine percent of parents think children their child’s age should read over the summer.
  • Eighty-six percent of children say they read a book (or books) over the summer.
  • On average, kids say they read 12 books over the summer.