What’s New with ReferenceUSA?

refusa competive advantageDecember Database Updates
U.S. Business

  • NEW fields added!
    • Accepts credit cards
    • Date business opened
    • Accepts American Express
  • New sourcing for medical records, which added:
    • 47k physicians
    • 17% more podiatrists
    • Medical school and graduation year for many records

U.S. Consumer:

  • 8 new TargetReady™ Models added, including Smartphone users, Online Music, and Hybrid Cars
  • 1.9MM new movers added

Promotion Idea from OverDrive

books to movie jan 2014Books that will soon become movies

Posted January 9, 2014 by under Library, Promotional Ideas, Schools.

In my last post, I talked about books that were made into movies throughout 2013. I didn’t hit all of them, trying instead to focus on the ones that I found intriguing.  In this post, I’ll talk a little about some movies destined for the big screen in the near future that are already popular books.

After the list, I’ll include some ideas we’ve come up with to promote these titles in the library.

Coming attractions

  1. Divergent by Veronica Roth: People are saying that this is the next Hunger Games. I don’t know about that, but I can definitely see the similarities in the book synopses and the movie previews. I plan on giving this one a read soon so I can see what all the hype is about. In any case, you’ve got until March of 2014 to squeeze this one in before the movie comes out.
  2. The Maze Runner by James Dashner: This movie isn’t coming out until September of 2014, so you’ve got a little time for reading. I’m told the book is quite good, and it’s pretty popular. With a major motion picture coming soon, it’s only going to become more so.  This one also has a bit of the Hunger Games feel to it from what I’ve heard.
  3. Winter’s Tale by Mark Helprin: Apparently io9 loves this book, and I’m a big fan of io9, so I’ll probably be reading it shortly. With the movie coming in February of 2014, there’s no time like the present to start building hype.
  4. The Ocean at the end of the Lane by Neil Gaiman: There’s no definite date set for this movie’s release, but it’s got some big names attached to it already. Personally, I find Neil Gaiman to be pretty fantastic, and am excited to read this book just as soon as I can get to it. If you haven’t guessed by now, I have a whole lot of books on my “to-read” list. Gaiman’s Stardust (both the book and movie) was awesome (if underrated).
  5. Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit (January 2014): As far as I know, this movie isn’t based on a specific Tom Clancy novel, but Jack Ryan is a recurring character in 16 of his books. The first novel (chronologically) is Without Remorse if you’d like somewhere to start before the movie comes out.  I’ve read a few of these books and enjoyed them.  Kenneth Branagh is directing the movie, and I’m definitely a fan (mostly for his Shakespeare stuff), so my hopes are high.
  6. The Last Apprentice: Revenge of the Witch by Joseph Delaney: This novel is known simply as The Spook’s Apprentice in the U.K.  I haven’t gotten around to reading this one yet, but the movie has been pushed back to 2015 (and is now called “Seventh Son”) so we have some time. The book has garnered quite the following, and, as for the movie, who doesn’t love Jeff Bridges?

Using movie hype to drive interest in the books

  • Get large movie posters and plaster them all over the place a few weeks before the movie comes out. Somewhere close to each poster, put up a sign that shows off the title in your digital collection. The sign could be as simple as a title details page screenshot or a statement saying “Borrow the eBook or audiobook from our digital collection!” You could also get fancy and generate a QR code with a direct link to the mobile title details page.
  • Once you’ve got posters (or some other signage) up, talk about the books. Make sure people hear that it was a book first.  Read the books so you know what you’re talking about and spread the word yourself.
  • Soon after the movie releases, have some popcorn and hold a book discussion comparing the book to the movie. You can promote the event ahead of time to generate some buzz (and circulation) around the title. The group book discussion will also help generate some word-of-mouth advertising for both the digital content and the library in general.
  • Have fun with it!  When the next Hobbit movie comes out (for example), have someone dress up as Gandalf to promote the fact that people can download the book for free from their library.  You can put out Hobbit-themed food, or hold a trivia contest with a fake golden ring as the prize.
  • Play related movies on Library TVs as release day approaches.  This isn’t always possible, but with a series it can work.  You can show either of the Hunger Games movies when the release of Mockingjay draws near, for example. Or build buzz for corresponding books around a TV series like Game of Thrones prior to the next season’s premier.

Need help getting started? We have a few sample “Book to Movie” flyers available for download in the Partner Portal.

Quinton Lawman is a Technical Writer on the Knowledge Services team at OverDrive.

“Also Available As eBook” Templates Now Available

stickerTo download the sticker template, click the side image.

Who doesn’t like stickers? Recently, electronic resources librarian Amy Calhoun shared how Sacramento Public Library has been giving its eBooks a physical presence by placing “Now in eBook Format!” stickers on the covers of corresponding titles in the physical collection. Calhoun’s Librarian Share blog post was a hit, and we’ve received a lot of feedback from libraries asking for similar stickers to promote their digital titles.

You asked, and we listened. Feel free to download this sticker template, print it on sticky labels, and apply where appropriate. We recommend printing the stickers on a sticker sheet comprised of 12, two-inch diameter circles (Avery products: 22807, 22817 or 22825). It’s a good idea to do a test print to ensure you’re loading your paper correctly. Also, to ensure the design prints properly, verify in your print settings that “Page Size” and “Handling” is set to “Actual Size.”

shelf talker

Shelf-talker templates  are also available to highlight digital titles among your stacks of books. Just print on both sides of the page (we recommend thicker paper, like card stock). Fold each shelf talker along the dotted line, then place inside a jacket cover or position conspicuously between books on the shelf.

Community Outreach Training

If you like the stickers and would like more ideas for how to promote your digital collection, join us for our Community Outreach training on Thurs., Feb. 7 at 12:00 pm EST. We’ll discuss ways to promote inside your library, around your community and online. This webinar is open for all OverDrive library partners.

Marketing Tip From Freegal

freegal marketing tipHow do YOU increase patron usage?

Each month we are featuring successful marketing campaigns from current Freegal subscribers.

This month’s tip is from Andrea Legg, the Extension & Technical Services Manager at Tuscarawas County Public Library System in New Philadelphia, OH.

According to Andrea, “We have been trying to market Freegal in unique ways during library events. The library recently hosted a Baby Steps 101 open house that showcased resources for new parents, including tips on making your own baby food, burp cloths, and baby slings. We set up a laptop with songs from various Rockabye Baby albums available on Freegal and distributed flyers that promoted the service to new parents. We did the same thing at a recent Christmas open house at the library, except we loaded the laptop with Freegal Christmas tracks and modified the flyers to promote Freegal’s extensive Christmas collection of available downloads.”

“Our stats are up 100+ downloads
this month from last month.” 

Andrea Legg, the Extension & Technical Services Manager at Tuscarawas County Public Library System in New Philadelphia, OH.  Check out their website at http://www.tusclibrary.org/

Please share your Freegal marketing success story with us.

Contact Stephanie Hall: stephanieh@libraryideas.com

 

Patron Profiles

Patron Profiles is the first, nationally trended survey of library users that tracks their experiences using library content and services, and puts this data in the context of broader consumer behavior. Awesome!

It tracks both a core set of questions and develops data on specific topics. All topics are about the use of digital content and services, including e-Books. Approximately 2000 individual respondents who are library users are tracked over time to identify trends.

How will this help Librarians?

  • Patron Profiles will help tell the library story, particularly around the e-Book revolution. It’s no secret that many libraries are struggling to respond to the avalanche of demand around e-Book content.
  • Libraries are required more and more to use sophisticated data with their boards and local politicians to state their case.  Because Patron Profiles tracks patterns over time – while providing libraries the ability to drill down to their own regional or population density levels – libraries can provide demonstrable evidence of our impact.
  • Libraries doing strategic planning cannot do so without using social media or surveys. It is a best practice. This publication can be instrumental in meeting that need.
  • Patron Profiles is another weapon in your toolkit to make you an effective spokesperson for your library. It gives you hard national data to compare your library with national trends. It takes you beyond just the anecdotal or output numbers.

I have uploaded all the Patron Profiles we have received to date to Voyager under Public Services for all staff to view. There are currently 5 profiles with the latest one just published.  I think you will find these very interesting reading.

OverDrive and Sony to Promote eBooks from Libraries

Sony Reader red
Sony Electronics, Inc., developer of the Sony Reader Digital Book, recently announced a joint marketing agreement with OverDrive. Both companies will market OverDrive’s network of more than 9,000 libraries worldwide and Sony Reader devices, which are compatible with all EPUB eBooks and most Adobe PDF eBooks offered on hundreds of OverDrive-powered download websites.

With this announcement, we can anticipate increased traffic to our ‘Virtual Branch’ website by Sony Reader owners looking to borrow EPUB and PDF eBooks using the Library Finder powered by OverDrive or http://search.overdrive.com.

is the new industry standard for eBooks, as accepted by the International Digital Publishing Forum (IDPF), and is compatible with Windows® and Mac®. EPUB offers reflowable text to fit any screen size and supports interactive graphics.

In addition, Sony also announced the release of a lower cost Reader model, the Reader Pocket Edition™, which retails for $199.99 USD and is available in three different colors. Sony is expected to also release a model featuring Wi-Fi connectivity (Reader Daily Edition™) by year-end. To date, our patrons can purchase the Sony Reader PRS-505, PRS-700, the new Reader Touch Edition™, and the Reader Pocket Edition.